The Laura McPhee Memorial Fund (Asthma) UK CHARITY

A beautiful princess will never be forgotten

ASTHMA   AWARENESS

ASTHMA AWARENESS DO YOU KNOW WHAT TO DO!!

ASTHMA ISNT A LITTLE ILLNESS IT IS MASSIVE AND VERY DANGEROUS IT TOOK MY BEAUTIFUL DAUGHTER LIFE AWAY MAKE SURE YOU KNOW WHAT TO DO! xx

 What to do in an asthma attack

What to do
• Keep calm
• Encourage the child or young person to sit up and slightly
...
forward – do not hug or lie them down
• Make sure the child or young person takes two puffs of reliever
inhaler (usually blue) immediately – preferably through a spacer
• Ensure tight clothing is loosened
• Reassure the child
If there is no immediate improvement
Continue to make sure the child or young person takes one puff of
reliever inhaler every minute for five minutes or until their
symptoms improve.

Call 999 or a doctor urgently if:
• The child or young person’s symptoms do not improve in
5–10 minutes.
• The child or young person is too breathless or exhausted to talk.
• The child or young person’s lips are blue.
• You are in doubt.

Ensure the child or young person takes one puff of their reliever
inhaler every minute until the ambulance or doctor arrives.
It is essential for people who work with children and young people with
asthma to know how to recognise the signs of an asthma attack and what to do if they have an asthma attack.

Common signs of an asthma attack are:
• coughing
• shortness of breath
• wheezing
• tightness in the chest
• being unusually quiet
• difficulty speaking in full sentences
• sometimes younger children express feeling
tight in the chest as a tummy ache.
After a minor asthma attack
• Minor attacks should not interrupt the
involvement of a pupil with asthma in school.
When the pupil feels better they can return to
school activities.
• The parents/carers must always be told if
their child has had an asthma attack.

Important things to remember in an asthma attack if at school:
• Never leave a pupil having an asthma attack.
• If the pupil does not have their inhaler and/or spacer with them,
send another teacher or pupil to their classroom or assigned room
to get their spare inhaler and/or spacer.
• In an emergency situation school staff are required under common
law, duty of care, to act like any reasonably prudent parent.
• Reliever medicine is very safe. During an asthma attack do not
worry about a pupil overdosing.
• Send another pupil to get another teacher/adult if an ambulance
needs to be called.
• Contact the pupil’s parents or carers immediately after calling the
ambulance/doctor.
• A member of staff should always accompany a pupil taken to
hospital by ambulance and stay with them until their parent or
carer arrives.
• Generally staff should not take pupils to hospital in their own car.
However, in some situations it may be the best course of action.
• Another adult should always accompany anyone driving a pupil
having an asthma attack to emergency services.
NB: Guidance from education authorities on emergency transport in
private vehicles is different in each part of the UK. Your school
should have a clear emergency procedure policy on if and when this
is appropriate.

 http://www.asthma.org.uk/document.rm?id=161

 

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